July 28, 2017

13 Hours: the Inside Account of What Really Happened in Benghazi by Mitchell Zuckoff with the Annex Security Team

Mention the word Benghazi and both liberals and conservatives bristle. Journalist Mitchell Zuckoff interviewed the private security personnel who were present on Sept. 11, 2012 in Benghazi, Libya and has created a non-fiction account that is absolutely riveting.

Although the principal American consulate in Libya was in Tripoli, Ambassador Christopher Stevens was visiting the diplomatic Compound in the secondary city of Benghazi on September 11, 2012. A few blocks away was a CIA center called the Annex with highly trained security guards who were tasked with keeping Ambassador Stevens and other American officials safe.

We are given first hand accounts of the attacks on both the Compound and the Annex. The reader is placed in the midst of fire, smoke, bullets and bombs. The bravery of both private and governmental agents is awe-inspiring.

Your political view of the debacle may not change, but you will certainly know more about what American personnel face when working in countries hostile to the United States.

I have not seen the 2016 movie adaptation by filmmaker Michael Bay, which received mixed reviews, but the movie title and tag line does illuminate a major theme in the well-written book. “13 Hours: the Secret Soldiers of Benghazi. When everything went wrong six men had the courage to do what was right.”

Girl Waits With Gun by Amy Stewart

My book-loving middle sister recommended Girl Waits With Gun by Amy Stewart, a delicious historical fiction about a woman who stands up to a spoiled heir who runs into their family horse and buggy with his new-fangled motor car.

Constance Kopp inadvertently begins to do detective work, learns how to handle a gun and uncovers crimes such as arson, kidnapping, assault, and even murder. The year 1914 vividly comes to life as we see the Kopp women, Constance, Norma and Fleurette battle not only thugs and bullies, but the restrictive roles placed upon women before World War I.

Amy Stewart’s writing reads like the best detective fiction yet the Kopp Sisters and their stories are based on fact. I see that Stewart has written two sequels to this rollicking read, Lady Cop Makes Trouble and Miss Kopp’s Midnight Confessions. I have to get copies, stat!

Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the F. B. I. by David Grann

If your taste runs to historical non-fiction, consider Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann, a staff writer for The New Yorker magazine and the previous bestselling author of The Lost City of Z.

A veritable “Reign of Terror” was waged on the Osage tribe in the 1920’s as wealthy members were bumped off for their money and “headrights.” Local law enforcement and courts in Oklahoma seemed unable or unwilling to investigate and prosecute the guilty parties.

Enter Tom White, a Western sheriff who was tasked by Edgar J. Hoover and his fledgling Federal Bureau of Investigation with getting to the bottom of this rash of Indian deaths by poison, guns and bombs.

Just when you think the case is all wrapped up, Grann digs deeper to find more skullduggery. The book reads like a cross between precise journalistic writing and a thriller. Killer of the Flower Moon belongs on the shelf with other books about the West, Native American history and the FBI. Truth is stranger than fiction, indeed.

GNOD – The Global Network of Discovery

I happened upon a site with the acronym gnod, quite by accident, while looking for authors similar to crime writers Donna Leon and Henning Mankell. Created by Marek Gibney in Hamburg, Germany, the Global Network of Discovery (gnod) features word maps to discover authors related to what you already like.

Not only can you look up networks of authors, but you can also fill out brief questionnaires that help the site learn more about people’s literary choices. The user is queried about whether you know, like or dislike a particular author.

The site also has sections on music, art, movies, and electronic products. In truth, the electronics portion seems to be the site’s commercial raison d’être, but this shouldn’t dampen your enjoyment of the rest of the site when you are looking for new authors, composers, films, and artists.

http://www.gnod.com/

The Nightingale by author Kristin Hannah

Published in 2015, The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah was the darling of book reviewers and book clubs alike when it first came out. It viewed World War II France from the perspective of two sisters, one woman who was trying to raise her daughter without fighting against the German occupiers and the other, an active member of the Resistance.

I must admit that the prose is not going to rival any of the great literary giants, but the plot is engaging and there are many emotional moments as the characters navigate through the treacherous waters of loyalty, patriotism, brutality, self-interest and love.

There seems to be an inexhaustible interest in World War II, Paris and the Resistance. This book belongs on the large shelf of entertaining historical fiction that is set during this turbulent and storied time.

Hannah, the author of over 20 books is yet another lawyer-turned-writer. She lives with herhusband in the Pacific Northwest and Hawaii.

http://kristinhannah.com/

The Handmaid’s Tale: Chilling series on Hulu

I must admit that I have never read any Margaret Atwood but The Handmaid’s Tale which debuted as a novel in 1985 has been on my “to do” list for years. Now comes a tv series adaptation of the iconic book presented as a Hulu original.

Elizabeth Moss (Peggy on Mad Men) is extraordinary as June/Offred, a baby-making handmaid in a religiously fanatic society of a frightening fictional future.  We see flashbacks of her previous unfettered life as a wife and mother along with scenes of her current servitude in the household of The Commander (Joseph Fiennes) and his barren but beautiful wife Serena Joy (Yvonne Strahovski). Her only reason for existence is to bear children for this upper crust couple.

Fellow handmaids include her revolutionary friend Emily played by Alexis Bledel (Gilmore Girls) and Moira, her friend from her married days, portrayed by Samira Wiley (Orange Is the New Black) who seemingly escapes from this dystopian world, biblically called Gilead, but whose whereabouts remain unknown.

Having watched five of the ten episodes, I can say this is a finely-made mini-series with vivid costumes, artful cinematography, intelligent dialogue and masterful acting. New episodes premiere on the Hulu streaming platform on Wednesdays. You could say I have the series “book-marked.”

Nutshell and The Vegetarian: Literary classics?

Do you remember having to read assigned books as a student where you didn’t enjoy the experience but you felt like you’d read something important when finished? Ulysses? War and Peace? The Stranger? Two recent books definitely deserve the description of “Literary” with a capital L.
Hang Kang, a female South Korean writer has penned a slim novel called The Vegetarian. Told in three parts, the lead character, Yeong-hye suddenly decides to become vegetarian after having recurring and unsettling dreams about animals. Her husband and family take the news poorly, to say the least.
Her brother-in-law, a modern video artist becomes obsessed with having her be the model for his latest creation. Divorce, suicide and a mental institution are the way-stations on Yeong-hye’s descent. A Korean reviewer deemed this short work as “very extreme and bizarre.” Still, the writing is beautiful and the sub-text intriguing.
Much easier to read, but no less disturbing is Nutshell by Ian McEwan whose literary output includes Atonement, named Time magazine’s best novel of 2002. McEwan has taken the tale of Hamlet and told it from the point of view of a fetus in the present day. The unborn child overhears his mother and uncle plot the murder of his father. One layer of the brief novel is what the embryo experiences, but McEwan has the child tap into a universal consciousness that allows the author to ruminate on current culture and thought. The prose is spare and gorgeously crafted.
After these two “meaty” books, I mightily need some sorbet in the form of a light detective novel or a rom-com paperback.

Robert Harris: The Fear Index, Conclave

I first heard about former BBC reporter, Robert Harris because of his trilogy on ancient Roman history (Imperium, Conspirata, Dictator). World War II is another area of interest for Harris having written both non-fiction and fiction works set in that era.

The book that first snagged my interest was Conclave, a novel about the selection of a Catholic pope in Rome. He manages to make a thriller out of this religious ritual as he depicts the factions and candidates vying for power in the Vatican.

Next on my nightstand was Harris’ The Fear Index, so different in subject matter that I had to keep looking at the cover to make sure that it was the same author. A scientist who has invented an algorithm for a hedge fund sees his luxurious life in Geneva, Switzerland unravel. The reader enters the world of cutting edge computers and of high finance.

My husband just finished Pompei and says Harris’ fine writing, historical research and edge-of-your-seat pacing is also evident in this novel set in 79 AD. This writer could seemingly take any topic and make it exciting. Robert Harris may be one author whose entire catalogue will be on my “to read” list.

13 Reasons Why on Netflix

My hairdresser first mentioned this series on Netflix and I always check out what he recommends. Based on the popular 2007 novel, Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher and adapted by Brian Yorkey for the 13 episode Netflix series, I initially didn’t connect with the first few minutes of episode one. There were some stilted line readings by side characters and the high school setting seemed like an after-school special.

Then I fell in love with young male actor Dylan Minette (originally from Evansville, Indiana) who plays Clay Jensen, a square kid who knew Hannah Baker, a recent high school suicide. I was immediately sucked into the story through his eyes and ears as he listens to 13 tapes made by Hannah before she committed suicide. Each cassette is dedicated to someone who made her life miserable. I was hooked.

Katherine Langford, an Australian actress who auditioned for the part of Hannah over Skype, heartbreakingly depicts a beautiful, talented and troubled teen. Kate Walsh, Steven Weber and Brian d’Arcy James are a few of the actors who fill adult roles in the series, but it is the young thespians who steal the show; Christian Navarro playing the cryptic Tony Padilla; Alisha Boe as the promiscuous and rebellious Jessica Davis; Brandon Flynn and Justin Prentice playing jock-bullies Justin Foley and Bryce Walker, respectively.

This is not a show for the weak-kneed. Vivid re-enactments of rape and suicide had me yelling, “No, no, no…” Despite this warning, this limited series allows you into the current world of youth, social media and bullying. I have seen articles pro and con about allowing kids to watch these episodes. Certainly the issues of rape and suicide would have to be carefully discussed. I give this emotionally-charged series a guarded recommendation for those brave enough to go to dark and troubling places.

News of the World: Instant literary classic

Every so often, I encounter a book that has all of the hallmarks of an enduring work of literature, with vivid characterizations, a plot with forward motion and elegant, depictive word choices. Such is the case with Paulette Jiles’ book, News of the World, a National Book Award Finalist.

As a poet and memoirist, as well as novelist, she writes beautiful prose. Her dialogue contains no quotation marks, so speech and narration seamlessly flow together.

We are introduced to Captain Jefferson Kyle Kidd, a military veteran who lost his printing business and very way of life during the Civil War. He now makes his living traveling from town to town in the northern Texas region reading the news of the world to people hungry for entertainment and knowledge. Armed with newspapers from New York, London, San Francisco and other points large and small, Kidd makes a meager but steady living.

Enter Johanna Leonberger, a six-year-old German girl who is captured by a Kiowa raiding party after they brutally kill her parents and sister.

Kidd is tasked with returning the now ten-year-old girl to her German relatives near San Antonio. After four years with the Kiowas, she speaks no English and has become native in her dress, behavior and in her very thinking.

Though the story of an older man on a quest with a young girl or boy has been a frequent novel convention, Jiles finds an unforgettable character in Kidd, plus an intriguing geographic setting and time in this outstanding, small, but potent work of fiction. The book format is indeed smaller than most hardcover editions and artfully tells the tale of their journey in just 209 pages. News of the World should deservedly find its way into high school and college literature classes.