April 21, 2021

Oprah’s “O Magazine” Print Version Calling It Quits After 20 Years

It was with sadness I learned of “O Magazine’s” decision to end its 20-year regular print run. The December 2020 issue will be its last featuring its beloved holiday tradition of choosing Oprah’s “Favorite Things.”

I have enjoyed “O’s” articles on food, fashion, health, psychology and impressive women, but the magazine was also a compendium of great books, clothing, make-up and services. In short, the publication encouraged women to “live your best life.”

Oprah has been on every single cover of the magazine, albeit sometimes sharing a photo with other humans or animals. This final issue has Oprah in a Volkswagen Beetle festooned with red wrapped presents.

Oprah assures readers they will still be able to get recommendations for all good things under the sun from OprahMag.com
Let me remind you that Harpo Studios and Discovery Inc. co-own the TV service, OWN (Oprah Winfrey’s Network) so you can commune with the Oprah brand via tv and streaming. You can also expect Oprah to print special magazine issues. Let’s hope she continues “Favorite Things” in some form for years to come. The December 2020 “O Magazine” issue is still available at newsstands.

“Emily In Paris” on Netflix

A visit to Paris seems none too imminent, so I did the next best thing: I watched “Emily In Paris” on Netflix. Darren Star, creator of “Sex in the City” and “Younger,” has created another series filled with appealing characters, killer clothing and alluring urban scenes.

Emily Cooper (played by Lily Collins channeling Audrey Hepburn), an exec in Chicago, is unexpectedly transferred to Paris for a job at a French marketing firm. There has been no time for her to learn the language, so she garners the derision of her French co-workers for being a gauche American. Her first friend is nanny Ashley Park, delightfully acted by Mindy Chen. Of course, there is the cute chef (Lucas Bravo) who lives in the apartment below hers, and her French friend, Camille, who just happens to be the chef’s girlfriend.

Shades of “The Devil Wore Prada,” the meanest character is Emily’s French boss, Sylvie (Philippine Leroy-Beaulieu) who denigrates Emily at every turn. Our heroine just keeps trying to take lemons and make “limonade.”

This 10-episode series reminds me of the romantic comedies at which the French excel, but with a decidedly American twist. The music soundtrack with songs in both French and English is a fun mix of new and old material. The cinematography shows Paris in all of her glory, from the architecture, to the Seine to sidewalk cafes like Les Deux Magots and Cafe Flore.

Reviews have been mixed, but I for one loved the atmosphere created by the clothing, the scenery and the screwball-esque dialogue despite the outlandish plot and sometimes over-the-top acting.

Put yourself on “joie de vivre” mode, make yourself a cafe au lait and visit “Emily In Paris” for a few hours.

Netflix Lured Me Back with Light Entertainment

After months of being a non-Netflix subscriber, I was lured back with the promise of new episodes of favorite shows.

Queer Eye has to be one of the most uplifting shows in TV Land right now. The rebooted series has breezed through four Seasons of 8 episodes each in U.S. states like Georgia, Kansas, Missouri and Illinois, with a one-episode season in Australia and a four episode run in Japan. For Season Five, the Queer Eye make-over team is in the Philadelphia, including one candidate from the Jersey Shore.

David Collins, producer of the original series which ran for five seasons from 2003 to 2007) has brilliantly adapted the concept for a new generation of viewers. As much as I liked the previous incarnation, the Netflix reboot has even more heart as the Fab Five tackle redos for men and women from all sorts of cultural backgrounds.

I love all five of these guys: Bobby Berk on design, Tan France on fashion, Jonathan Van Ness for grooming, but I especially love the emotional insight that Karamo Brown brings and the food love that Antoni Porowski evokes. This is my kind of show when I need the world to seem like a happier and safer place.

If you want something even more goofy and light, you might consider The Big Flower Fight. Netflix has taken the reality competition into the floral arena. Teams of two use flowers, grasses and evergreens, as well as man-made and organic elements, to create animals, dresses, thrones, mobiles and fairy tale scenes.

The Big Flower Fight has much in common with The Great British Baking Show which is amply represented on Netflix. Food, fashion and flower competitions are entertaining stress relievers and Netflix is providing lots of fun options.

Cara Cotton Gloves

I have been seeing discarded plastic medical gloves on sidewalks and in gutters. Wanting to come up with a hand-covering that is reusable and more organic, I purchased white cotton gloves in a package of 24. I use them once and then throw them in with the other white laundry items. Hot water, bleach and soap is purported to clean and sterilize them.

The gloves come in all different sizes and you don’t necessarily have to buy them in bulk, but if you have multiples, you are less tempted to reuse them after out-of-home use.

People may see your white-gloved hands and think you are a mime, but we just may start a current day fashion trend.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00CIBQD7I?tag=duckduckgo-osx-20&linkCode=osi&th=1&psc=1

Making the Cut on Amazon Prime Video

Call me crazy but I love reality competition shows especially for food or fashion. Amazon Prime has entered the competitive fray with Making the Cut starring Heidi Klum and Tim Gunn whose previous fashion-centric progam, Project Runway, ran with them as hosts for 16 seasons on Bravo and Lifetime, respectively.

Although the two show formats seem similar, Gunn and Klum have upped the ante with international designer contestants who have already achieved some career recognition meaning there is less emotional drama and more professionalism. The winner receives a million dollars and a marketing deal with Amazon. High incentive for these talented competitors.

The premiere season takes place in New York, Paris and Tokyo adding a glamorous travel aspect. The judges include model and British Vogue fashion consultant Naomi Campbell and Nicole Richie, creator of fashion brand, House of Harlow. Getting to know the judges as well as the contestants is part of the fun; Campbell is brutally honest and Richie is surprisingly articulate. The real stars are Klum and Gunn who have little comic interludes that would be annoying if the two weren’t so damn cute.

Project Runway has continued back on Bravo with new hosts and judges for Seasons 17 and 18, but for my money, Making the Cut on Amazon is indeed a cut above the competition.

The Making the Cut Amazon page allows you to buy winning looks from the show, or purchase items from Tim’s Closet Staples, Heidi Klum Intimates, or judges companies, House of Harlow and Altuzara. More proof that Amazon is taking over the world.

Making the Cut Amazon page

Riviera TV Series on Sundance Now

When the mood is somber in your home and abroad, what better way to disperse the blues than to watch some escapist soap opera fare? Riviera, set in, you guessed it, southern France and Monaco is definitely eye candy.

The show has quite a pedigree. Neil Jordan, the director of such notable films as Mona Lisa and The Crying Game, has created and co-written Riviera with high brow British author, John Banville. Jordan has since disavowed any connection to the series with the addition of sex scenes and writing changes that he did not sanction. That somehow ups the trash factor allure.

The cast features Julia Stiles as recent widow, Georgina Clios whose husband, billionaire and art collector Constantine Clios is mysteriously blown up on a yacht in episode one. Anthony LaPaglia plays the shady mogul in flash backs, with Lena Olin dramatically entering the scene as his first wife. The most surprising cast member is Will Arnett in a semi-serious role as Georgina’s uncle.

The plot is littered with screwed up children, rich and dangerous friends, racehorses, scary strong men, corporate skullduggery and art fraud.

I can see why Jordan has divorced himself from this project. Murder, mental illness, kidnapping, and surprise parentage are soap opera staples thrown into this improbable potpourri. Still, the cinematography, the homes, the clothing and the very bad behavior is strangely compelling. Just what the doctor ordered when stuck at home without a Monet on the wall or a bottle of Dom Perignon in the wine cave.

I watch Sundance Now as an added channel on my Amazon Prime Video account.