July 28, 2017

The future of eyeglasses

While the big tech companies are perfecting Virtual Reality glasses, I have been keeping my eye on what’s happening in everyday vision ware.

Omnifocal Glasses by an Israeli company called Deep Optics promises to allow us to see whatever distance we focus on with the use of a layer of transparent liquid crystal and electrical current. The glasses will ultimately change your prescription instantaneously with the help of sensors that track your pupils and determine what distance they are looking at. The company has not succeeded in packing all of this technology into simple glasses yet, but liquid crystal lenses are literally around the corner. http://www.deepoptics.com/do_site/

You can now pre-order the amazing Shima glasses by Laforge for $590. Imagine glasses that can give you directions, tell you how far you’ve walked and play your favorite music through an app on your smart phone. And these glasses have stylish frames, not the futuristic and bulky VR glasses that Google and other companies are designing.

https://www.laforgeoptical.com

Don’t laugh but many people ascribe to the idea that looking through lenses of specific colors have the ability to improve one’s function and mood. Blue may promote relaxation and calmness; orange is supposed increase social confidence and cheerfulness along with cancelling out the blue light of electronic devices; yellow encourages concentration and mental clarity and may additionally help with night time driving.

After a brief internet search, I find no glasses that can electronically give you a rainbow of color options. Yes, there are glasses that go from clear to shaded sunglasses, but for other colors, one must buy a regular pair with only one color of lens. Here is a site that will sell you those single color glasses and explains more about color therapy.
If you know of an electronic pair that allows the wearer to change the color of lens, please let me know!

http://www.colorglasses.com/

I might wait until I can purchase a pair of electronic glasses that have all of the above features, but there will undoubtedly be a company that can implant a sophisticated electronic device directly into my eyes.
And soon.
Who is with me in entering this brave and slightly terrifying new world?

Tilly Vintage Boutique in Andersonville

Some of you may know of my passion for fashion and of my continual quest for affordable clothing and accessories.

I recently bought a consignment dress at another establishment that came without buttons or cuff links for the French cuff sleeves. What to do?

Walking my dog this past week, I popped my head inside the door of Tilly Vintage Boutique in Andersonville and asked the salesclerk if they had cuff links. “But, of course,” she said. I returned with the dress and without my big furry dog.

The salesclerk brought out trays of cuff links in both feminine and masculine styles. There they were: the perfect match for my evening dress for just $19.

There are shelves of necklaces, earrings, bracelets, rings, hat and purses plus dresses, jackets and clothing from different eras that hang from the ceiling and walls. Weather permitting, mannequins and a clothing rack in front of the store beckon shoppers within.

Tilly’s used to be on Lincoln Avenue where I found an authentic evening gown in excellent condition from the 1920’s. The store is smaller in its Andersonville location, but continues to stock amazing fashion finds. Who knew recycling could be such fun? Or rather upcycling, according to owner Susan Lynch!

https://www.facebook.com/Tilly-189245661159776/

Nike’s HyperAdapt 1.0 smart sneakers

Remember when tying your shoes was a rite of passage for your children, your students or you? Well, Nike will be selling sneakers in November that make that simple action obsolete.

Their self-lacing  sneakers are reminiscent of the pair worn by Marty McFly in the iconic movie, Back To the Future. The shoes electronically sense whether the laces need to be tightened or loosened providing an “Adaptive Fit.”

The sole of the HyperAdapt 1.0 shoes feature a lit sole that indicates if you are “powered up.” Does this mean that we will charge our sneakers next to our phones? Nike, can you give us some jet propulsion next?

For more information:
http://news.nike.com/news/hyperadapt-adaptive-lacing

The First Monday in May doc on Netflix

My hairdresser recommended The First Monday In May,  a wonderful documentary by Andrew Rossi on Netflix that mixes art, fashion and a bit of world politics.

Film footage shows astoundingly beautiful clothing in inventive gallery settings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, but we also get to see the backstage mechanics of creating this annual fashion fantasy.

Design powerhouse, Anna Wintour is shown in action as she determines what is tasteful. Interviews with clothing designers Karl Lagerfeld, Jean Paul Gaultier and John Galliano are sprinkled throughout the film.

The real star of the costume exhibit is the Met’s Costume Curator, Andrew Bolton, a shy Brit who quietly works his magic behind the scenes.

The doc builds to the opening of China: Through the Looking Glass, the Met’s costume exhibit of 2014. Chinese government entities, Film director Wong Kar Wai and the Met staff reach a middle ground showing older Chinese fashions as well as current designs by Asian and Western clothing designers.

Those not mad about fashion might be titillated by the kick-off dinner’s celebrity red carpet arrivals including George and Amal Clooney and Rihanna, garbed in a most dramatic brilliant yellow gown with the longest train of recent memory.

Attending this annual summer-long costume exhibit at Metropolitan Museum of Art now goes on my “to do in life” list.  Anybody for a trip to New York next May?

Dressing Downton: Driehaus Museum

If you are a fan of the PBS series Downton Abbey, the current exhibit, Dressing Downton at the lovely Driehaus Museum is definitely your cup of tea.

For $25, you get to peruse costumes from the show sprinkled throughout the ornate home, along with selected photos from the popular program. In my opinion, it was worth every penny.

You get to see the fashion transition from the Edwardian age of corsets and long skirts to the flapper era of bobbed hair, shorter skirts and unrestrictive undergarments. Michelle Dockery who plays Mary must be absolutely tiny based on her dresses.

Admission includes free coat check as well as audio and printed exhibition guides.

And if this exhibit is truly your cup of tea, you might want to make a reservation for the high tea service in the adjacent building. It’s a bit pricey at $55 but the ladies and gentlemen relishing scones looked like they were having a grand time.

Dressing Downton runs through May 8, 2016.

www.driehausmuseum.org/dressing_downton

Iris – Documentary on Netflix

Some have suggested that streaming services have helped create a documentary golden age of sorts. Iris, a doc currently on Netflix, is about fashion icon Iris Apfel. This grande dame of fashion is known for her short white hair, her over-sized black glasses and her love of colorful clothing and accessories. The Metropolitan Museum, no less, featured an exhibit of her madcap combinations of bracelets, necklaces and vintage as well as ethnic ensembles. This 79 minute by filmmaker Albert Maysles (Grey Gardens) will appeal to not only fashion fans, but to anyone who wants to see a seasoned woman still having the time of her life. Catch her husband’s outfits, too!