May 29, 2020

Cara Cotton Gloves

I have been seeing discarded plastic medical gloves on sidewalks and in gutters. Wanting to come up with a hand-covering that is reusable and more organic, I purchased white cotton gloves in a package of 24. I use them once and then throw them in with the other white laundry items. Hot water, bleach and soap is purported to clean and sterilize them.

The gloves come in all different sizes and you don’t necessarily have to buy them in bulk, but if you have multiples, you are less tempted to reuse them after out-of-home use.

People may see your white-gloved hands and think you are a mime, but we just may start a current day fashion trend.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00CIBQD7I?tag=duckduckgo-osx-20&linkCode=osi&th=1&psc=1

Making the Cut on Amazon Prime Video

Call me crazy but I love reality competition shows especially for food or fashion. Amazon Prime has entered the competitive fray with Making the Cut starring Heidi Klum and Tim Gunn whose previous fashion-centric progam, Project Runway, ran with them as hosts for 16 seasons on Bravo and Lifetime, respectively.

Although the two show formats seem similar, Gunn and Klum have upped the ante with international designer contestants who have already achieved some career recognition meaning there is less emotional drama and more professionalism. The winner receives a million dollars and a marketing deal with Amazon. High incentive for these talented competitors.

The premiere season takes place in New York, Paris and Tokyo adding a glamorous travel aspect. The judges include model and British Vogue fashion consultant Naomi Campbell and Nicole Richie, creator of fashion brand, House of Harlow. Getting to know the judges as well as the contestants is part of the fun; Campbell is brutally honest and Richie is surprisingly articulate. The real stars are Klum and Gunn who have little comic interludes that would be annoying if the two weren’t so damn cute.

Project Runway has continued back on Bravo with new hosts and judges for Seasons 17 and 18, but for my money, Making the Cut on Amazon is indeed a cut above the competition.

The Making the Cut Amazon page allows you to buy winning looks from the show, or purchase items from Tim’s Closet Staples, Heidi Klum Intimates, or judges companies, House of Harlow and Altuzara. More proof that Amazon is taking over the world.

Making the Cut Amazon page

Riviera TV Series on Sundance Now

When the mood is somber in your home and abroad, what better way to disperse the blues than to watch some escapist soap opera fare? Riviera, set in, you guessed it, southern France and Monaco is definitely eye candy.

The show has quite a pedigree. Neil Jordan, the director of such notable films as Mona Lisa and The Crying Game, has created and co-written Riviera with high brow British author, John Banville. Jordan has since disavowed any connection to the series with the addition of sex scenes and writing changes that he did not sanction. That somehow ups the trash factor allure.

The cast features Julia Stiles as recent widow, Georgina Clios whose husband, billionaire and art collector Constantine Clios is mysteriously blown up on a yacht in episode one. Anthony LaPaglia plays the shady mogul in flash backs, with Lena Olin dramatically entering the scene as his first wife. The most surprising cast member is Will Arnett in a semi-serious role as Georgina’s uncle.

The plot is littered with screwed up children, rich and dangerous friends, racehorses, scary strong men, corporate skullduggery and art fraud.

I can see why Jordan has divorced himself from this project. Murder, mental illness, kidnapping, and surprise parentage are soap opera staples thrown into this improbable potpourri. Still, the cinematography, the homes, the clothing and the very bad behavior is strangely compelling. Just what the doctor ordered when stuck at home without a Monet on the wall or a bottle of Dom Perignon in the wine cave.

I watch Sundance Now as an added channel on my Amazon Prime Video account.

My Goodbye to Netflix

I have been a long-time subscriber of Netflix, all the way back when their business was predominantly mailing DVDs to one’s home. In 2010, they added streaming to their business model, which has exploded into 148 million streaming subscriptions by the end of 2019.

Sad to say, I have put my membership on hold while I explore other competitive services such as CBS All Access, Starz, Showtime and Sundance Now. I will eventually give newcomers AppleTV+ and Disney+ a look-see, too.

In a last hurrah, I enjoyed four shows before pausing my membership.

The Great British Baking Show is my favorite way to unwind from politics and the cares of the day. Netflix has a large catalogue of GBBS versions, 7 Collections (seasons), Master classes and holiday shows. Could Netflix look into carrying spin-offs of this show from Canada, the United States and Australia?

Project Runway has been on my radar since its inception in 2004. Netflix has done a pretty good job of creating their version of the successful fashion competition with Next In Fashion. Tan France, the fashion consultant from the newer Queer Eye show, makes for a great host along with Alexa Chung. The format is similar to PR but the contestants now have a fabric store on the set. To be honest, I miss Tim Gunn taking the designers to Mood NYC to purchase fabric and hang out with mascot, Swatch.

The Witcher was a hate-watch streaming series for me, but watch it I did with the handsome Henry Cavill, period settings and costumes dressing up the fantastical plots. Would I watch a Season Two down the road? Mayhaps.

Goop Lab features Gwyneth Paltrow and employees of the hugely successful life-style brand Goop. The six episode season explores alternative health, beauty and well-being services like cold exposure, psychedelics and energetic healing. This may be a series that is more attractive to women, but men could learn a lot about alternative therapies, and women in general.

Aside from the aforementioned shows, many of the recent Netflix original programs just have not been to my taste. They have not lost me for good, but I will have to be wooed back with a mix of both creative Netflix productions and popular programming from outside sources. Are you listening Netflix?

Rocketman, a film inspired by the life of Sir Elton John

Released last year, Rocketman, the bio pic based on Elton John’s early life, has been currently available on selected streaming sites. In short, Taron Egerton is a wonder as Sir Elton. He justifiably won a Golden Globe as best actor for his performance, but was inexplicably left off the list of this year’s Oscar nominations.

Film credits go to director Dexter Fletcher and screenplay writer Lee Hall for choosing a dramatic arc in John’s life that has great emotional resonance. We see his difficult childhood, his precocity at the Royal Academy of Music in London and his search for a musical path. Enter lyricist, Bernie Taupin, played by actor Jamie Bell, who teams up with Elton to add words to his prolific compositions.

We see his meteoric rise as he conquers British and American music markets and becomes fabulously wealthy. Like a rocket, what goes up, must come down. Along the way, he tries to commit suicide and becomes addicted to alcohol, cocaine, cannabis, shopping and sex. The movie effectivelyly uses his participation in a rehab group as a device to tell the story.

Throughout the film, we hear those iconic hits and are bemused by his journey through ever more outrageous clothing and accessories. Those platform shoes! Those eyeglasses!

Elton John’s journey in this movie feels a little bit like that of Rocky Balboa’s in the Rocky franchise, but that is not a bad thing. We are rooting for him to turn his life around. Stay for the final credits where you get to read about “the rest of the story.”

If you love Elton John’s music, Rocketman is a must, but the film is inspiring enough for those who are less familiar with his work. Fashionistas will have a visual feast, producing both horror and delight.

Manet and Modern Beauty at the Art Institute of Chicago

You might think that yet another art show on a French Impressionist would be a missable event, but the Art Institute’s exhibit, Manet and Modern Beauty should change your mind.

It has been over 50 years since the AIC has done a solo show on Edouard Manet and the curators have wisely honed in on his later years. Ill health and less mobility may have caused him to turn to smaller canvases and more intimate subjects like feminine beauty with pastels and water colors joining his use of oils.

I loved a small transitional room featuring live plants, a lovely view of the green foliage outside of the museum and a wall of photos depicting Manet’s social network. Unbeknownst to me, female artist Berthe Morisot was his sister-in-law.

His letters on display are filled with delightful images of flowers, fruits and beautifully dressed women. We also get to see unfinished works that allow the viewer to get glimpses of his creative process. The exhibit is punctuated with his larger oil canvases as well. A final room of his flower paintings is like the dessert course to this satisfying artistic meal.

All children under 14 and Chicagoans under age 18 are admitted free. Illinois residents gain free admittance Thursdays from 5 pm to 8 pm when the museum is open later.

https://www.artic.edu/exhibitions/2822/manet-and-modern-beauty