July 22, 2018

Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story on Netflix

My mother was movie-mad and one of her favorite actresses was the beautiful Hedy Lamarr. Hedy had an accent but I knew virtually nothing about her background.

A documentary on Netflix, Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story will surprise and enlighten you about this Hollywood star’s vertiginous journey.

Like German-born Marlene Dietrich, Hedy, an Austrian Jew left her Nazi-leaning country for California to pursue a movie career. She became an ardent supporter of the U. S. cause selling millions of dollars worth of war bonds.

Her scientific interest and natural talent at devising inventions was the real shocker. This gorgeous dame was also smart. She shared a patent for frequency hopping with composer George Antheil, a concept that is used in both civilian and military applications in current day. Unfortunately, she earned not one penny from this brilliant invention.

Her beauty was also her curse. Six failed marriages were perhaps a result of men falling in love with the Hollywood image but not the actual woman. As she aged, she became one of the first devotees of plastic surgery in an attempt to hang on to her storied face.
Her last years were spent in seclusion, much like Garbo and Dietrich. Were these beauties unwilling to let the public see them as older versions of their movie images?

If Hedy Lamarr had been born with average looks, would a scientific career have resulted in a more stable life and even more successful inventions?
The documentary allows the viewer to ponder the remarkable life of Hedy Lamarr and draw their own conclusions.

A trusted friend recommended the documentary and pointed out these words quoted by Lamar towards the end of the movie. An internet search indicates that the quote was erroneously attributed to Mother Teresa. The full quote was actually written by college student Kent M. Keith in 1968. Here are all ten of the inspiring ideas:

1: People are illogical, unreasonable, and self-centered. Love them anyway.
2: If you do good, people will accuse you of selfish ulterior motives. Do good anyway.
3: If you are successful, you win false friends and true enemies. Succeed anyway.
4: The good you do today will be forgotten tomorrow. Do good anyway.
5: Honesty and frankness make you vulnerable. Be honest and frank anyway.
6: The biggest men with the biggest ideas can be shot down by the smallest men with the smallest minds. Think big anyway.
7: People favor underdogs, but follow only top dogs. Fight for a few underdogs anyway.
8: What you spend years building may be destroyed overnight. Build anyway.
9: People really need help but may attack you if you do help them. Help people anyway.
10: Give the world the best you have and you’ll get kicked in the teeth. Give the world the best you have anyway.

The Big Sick movie streaming on Amazon

I recently wrote about the podcast, Stay Tuned With Preet which featured an interview with writer/actor/comedian Kumail Nanjiani who was unfamiliar to me.

Amazon is currently streaming The Big Sick, with a script co-written by Nanjiani and his wife, Emily V. Gordon. The film definitely covers all the bases of a romantic comedy, but it also examines a Pakistani Muslim family’s belief in arranged marriage, the challenging life of a stand-up comedian and the travails of our medical system when one is faced with a serious and unknown malady.

The film is based on how Kumail and Emily met before their marriage. Emily’s medically-induced coma ultimately brings the couple together as Kumail holds vigil with Emily’s out-of-town mother and father. Ray Romano and Holly Hunter turn in winning performances as Emily’s open-minded but very white parents.

Kumail Nanjiani and his wife Emily V. Gordon (Zoe Kazan is cast as Gordon in the movie; Nanjiani plays himself.)

You may find yourself laughing at the comedic dialogue yet getting a little teary at some of the touching scenes about life, death and love.

Kumail Nanjiani’s acting and writing credits for tv, movies and video games indicate that he not only got the girl, but he’s done pretty well for himself. He and his wife have turned their rocky courtship in Chicago into an intelligent yet hilarious movie. The Big Sick was indeed a diverting film to view on a cold winter’s night at home.

The Shape of Water by filmmaker Guillermo del Toro

Mexican film director, Guillermo del Toro has created another dark fantasy world, this time set in 1962 Baltimore in his most recent film, The Shape of Water.

Sally Hawkins is cast as Elisa Esposito, a mute janitor in a secret government science facility. Along with her fellow cleaner, Zelda Fuller (the inimitable Octavia Spenser), they watch a creature from South America being violently transferred to a tank in their place of employment. Michael Shannon as Colonel Richard Strickland is the cruel handler of this living asset.

Elisa and the amphibious man develop a connection, shall we say. She recruits her neighbor Giles, a closeted gay artist played by Richard Jenkins, along with friend Zelda to kidnap her aqueous paramour. Did I mention that the Russians are also interested in the fate of this seemingly sentient water being?

The Cold War, racial segregation, cruelty to living creatures and the subjugation of women all figure into the film’s setting. Despite the heavy references, this movie should satisfy the horror and romance date crowd, as well as serious film buffs.

If you enjoyed del Toro’s 2006 film, Pan’s Labryinth, you will love The Shape of Water. You may not see much sun or anything sunny in this dark work, but there is beauty, humor and emotion nonetheless.

Get Out, a movie on HBO GO

Twenty-somethings at a recent party were all raving about a strange and engrossing movie called Get Out. Written and directed by Jordan Peele (of the comedy team Keegan and Peele), a bi-racial couple, Chris Washington (Daniel Kaluuya) and Rose Armitage (Allisonn Williams) visit her white and very strange parents who live in a bucolic and privileged enclave.

The Armitage family employ black servants who act like automatons. Things get even weirder as people show up for an annual party on the estate. Catherine Keener plays the therapist mother who may have hypnotized boyfriend Chris. Her husband is actor Bradley Whitford playing the forceful and phony suburbanite Dean Armitage.

My favorite character is TSA agent, Rod Williams (actor Lil Rel Hower) who is Chris’ friend and phone advisor as he encounters these unsettling events.

You will find yourself laughing and pulled along by the off-beat storyline, but make no mistake, the movie is exploring some brutally honest and horrifying concepts in our history and culture.

We still need Peele to be funny as a comedian, but here’s hoping that this is the first of his many films that allow him to visit the dark side. Pun intended. We will all be challenged and wiser for it.

If you don’t have HBO GO, you can purchase the movie at iTunes, Amazon Instant Video or YouTube.

Bladerunner 2049, currently in movie theaters

Rocket ahead 35 years and Blade Runner 2049 gives an update of the iconic 1982 Blade Runner movie. This is no remake but a continuation of the story with Harrison Ford playing a very agile senior citizen on the lam along with cameos by Edward James Olmos and an electronically-created Sean Young who were both in the original. The 1982 director, Ridley Scott is on board as one of this project’s executive directors, too.

Make no mistake, this movie is a different animal with French-Canadian director Denis Villeneuve at the helm, and Ryan Gosling is the errant-replicant hunter.  The cinematography is stunning, the score uses industrial-type noise in a symphonic manner and the story line is clear. I enjoyed the experience although the almost 3 hour film could have been shortened by at least 20 minutes. My husband was hugely disappointed however, having been a big fan of the original film.

True, the vivid characters created by Rutger Hauer and Daryl Hannah in the 1982 movie have no equals in this new take on the dystopian world created by author Philip K. Dick. Unfortunately, Robin Wright and Jared Leto, excellent actors both, do not have roles in this film that allow them to give similarly indelible performances.

Still and all, if you like the neo-noir science fiction genre and have any affection for the 1982 Blade Runner production, you could do worse than to choose Blade Runner 2049 as a movie option.  On the flip side, my husband would have preferred to have stayed home.

Please let me know your thoughts if you catch this film, but be forewarned that a small screen will not do this film justice. I did not have the benefit of a 3-D version but you may want to find a theater that gives you that option.

Let’s hope this is NOT what our world looks like at mid-21st century!

Davis Theater in Chicago’s Lincoln Square

I had heard that the Davis Theater in Lincoln Square had undergone a recent facelift but I was pleasantly surprised at how successfully the old theater was transformed. The lobby is welcoming with a display of old movie paraphernalia, a cheery concessions stand and reclining chairs with cup holders in the three different viewing rooms. Art deco touches, both new and vintage are found throughout building and the renovators uncovered the original vaulted ceiling in the main 300-seat auditorium. The sound system appeared to be much improved also, plus a wireless mike system was installed for film events and corporate rentals of the space.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The addition of Carbon Arc, a bar/restaurant that is attached to the movie lobby is the biggest change. You can take food into your movie using a tray that snaps into the back of the seat in front of you. Think of an airline meal experience but with more leg room, a cushier seat and more sophisticated meal selections.

Even the bathrooms got a design redo with graphic wallpaper and a clean silver, black and white palette.

Thanks for this loving restoration go to theater owner Tom Fencl, the designers of Analogous Company, Kennedy Mann Architecture and the National Park Service which lent money on behalf of this historic landmark building. Kudos for not just tearing the building down but finding a way to modernize the operation while not destroying its connection to the past.

Non-chain movie houses and bookstores have a chance of survival if they become social venues for their communities. Davis Theater is now a lovely destination in the Lincoln Square neighborhood.

https://www.davistheater.com/