March 28, 2020

Virtual Tours of Notable Places: The Prado in Madrid

People have been posting ideas on how to use one’s “home time.” As much as I love music, I do, on occasion, need to explore other topics.

I was remembering visits to favorite art museums which led to thinking about famous museums that I have not yet visited. Uppermost on my wish list is the Prado in Madrid, Spain. Here is a five minute clip that highlights some of the Prado’s art treasures, including paintings by El Greco, Velazquez, de Goya and my personal favorite, the triptych work by Hieronymus Bosch, The Garden of Earthly Delights.

I erroneously assumed that Guernica by Pablo Picasso was also at the Prado. In reality, the famous large canvas is in Madrid, but at the Museo Reina Sofia.

Here’s to seeing Madrid and its art treasures when the world returns to health.

WNDR Museum in Chicago West Loop

Do you need an indoor idea for fun during our winter weather? Are there any people under 40 you want to impress with your coolness? Look no further than the WNDR Museum in the west Chicago Loop.

Visitors wander from room to room experiencing immersive visual and audio environments. Tech artists have created scenarios where you become part of the art such as in the black box room that places you on a screen and then morphs it into a kaleidoscope of images. A disco room allows you to use LED flooring to paint swirls with your feet.

One of my favorite stops was the Mirror Room by renowned Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama. Also intriguing was a black and white room with slanted floor. An arm appeared out of a wall cut-out and a voice asked if we wanted a photo taken with our phones. In truth, the whole museum is one big Instagram opportunity.

There are creative rooms where the visitors can explore their artistic muse using old-fashioned paper and materials provided by Wndr. A snack area features curated treats for purchase and a large complimentary cereal bar replete with milk, both cow’s and alternative.

Yes, admission is over-priced and repeat visits might not be forthcoming for most adults, but this is most entertaining for an hour or two. And you just might find a bauble or two in the quirky museum store.

Photo temporarily displayed on the museum walls. Me with husband Paul and Jim Koudelka.

Be forewarned that the museum does not handle cash. All transactions must be done through the internet or with a credit card.

By all means, bring your phone. Selfies encouraged.

wndrmuseum.com

Andy Warhol – From A to B and Back Again at AIC

The Art Institute is presenting a major retrospective of the varied works of Andy Warhol. The exhibition features not only his large canvas works, but his early ad work, his drawings, his films, his television presentations, his sculpture and his collaborative art with the much younger artist, Basquiat. This is indeed a comprehensive look at his entire career.

Although he is best known for his brightly colored photo portraits of celebrities like Marilyn Monroe, Liza Minnelli, Muhammed Ali, Elvis, Elizabeth Taylor and Mao, it is perhaps his ”Death and Disaster” images that I found the most disturbing and thought-provoking. Car crashes, race riots, electric chairs and images of a widowed Jackie Kennedy seem to reflect how Warhol saw the turbulent mid-1960s.

As for the exhibition design, I love how the AIC has made wall cut-outs that let the observer see into other rooms, provided a mini-movie theater to view Warhol films and installed several small screens to view his television shows. The exhibit vestibule featuring his photos of famous people is a fitting beginning and ending to this homage to Andy Warhol.

A painter friend sniffed that using a print of DaVinci’s Last Supper and placing camouflage over it is hardly art, but nonetheless, Warhol has certainly had much more than the proverbial “15 minutes of fame”.

Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, IL 60603

https://www.artic.edu/exhibitions/2937/andy-warhol-from-a-to-b-and-back-again

Through January 26, 2020

Van Gogh, Starry Night Art Experience in Paris

After two different ex-pats in Europe urged me to catch the Van Gogh, Starry Night art exhibit in Paris, I took notice. This was indeed no ordinary art exposition, but an Art Music Immersive Experience at the Atelier des Lumieres in the 11th arrondissement near the Père Lachaise Cemetery.

L’Atelier des Lumieres, the first digital center for art in Paris, opened in 2018 with a show featuring the work of Gustav Klimt. Would that I had a time machine to catch that show now. Bing images will have to suffice.

The current show featuring Vincent Van Gogh’s work is an otherworldly mix of his painted images from faces, to furniture, to landscapes to the famous starry night painting. Van Gogh’s brush strokes are almost palpable; his handwriting is even scrolled across the 140 video projectors throughout the former iron foundry.

An incredible sound system surrounds you in music of various types while you soak up the Van Gogh images. The soundtrack includes Janis Joplin, Nina Simone, Maria Callas, Miles Davis, Die Moldau by Smetana and an eerie version of Mozart’s Piano Concerto in C Major. However disparate the musical pieces are, they all seem to complement the enchanting visuals.

Some people choose to sit or stand in one area while viewing the multi-media presentation while others meander through the industrial space. There is a mosaic lined water pool on view below the main floor, a balcony and two additional viewing rooms, one round, the other glass or mirror-lined.

Two shorter eye-popping films play between the periodic Van Gogh program, Dreamed Japan, Images of the Floating World and Verse by Thomas Vanz but the real draw is Van Gogh, Starry Night (La Nuit Étoilée). The Atelier des Lumieres site recommends to plan for an hour in the space.

If you or someone you know is going to be in Paris through Dec. 31, 2019, please suggest they catch this impressive art and music experience. Admission may not be purchased at the venue, so order your tickets on-line. 14.5 Euros per adult and well worth it.

The official site: https://www.atelier-lumieres.com/en/van-gogh-starry-night

If you can’t attend, here are Bing images from the Van Gogh show:

https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=van+gogh+exhibit+paris+2019&id=D0FAA86B1F68580C3D995F75F91BB7BE1E83B1B4&FORM=IQFRBA

Glessner House Courtyard concert on Sept. 25

I recently played a concert in the Glessner House courtyard with bass player Jim Cox. The evening was so lovely that I wanted to let people know about the second show I will be doing with guitarist John Papodolias on Wednesday, September 26 from 6 pm to 8 pm.

Attendees bring their own food, beverages, blankets and lawn chairs. It’s like a mini-Ravinia experience with Italian white lights strung across the Glessner House courtyard giving a soft glow to the atmosphere.

The cover charge is $10 per person and that also includes a tour of the museum after the show if desired. How could you pass up a chance to see Glessner House at night without crowds?

A little about Glessner House which is one of the understated gems in the city. William Tyre, executive director and curator of the museum has worked tirelessly for 12 years to provide a historical and architectural experience like no other.

John Jacob Glessner (an industrialist involved with the beginning of International Harvester) and his wife, Frances hired notable Chicago architect H. H. Richardson to design them a stunning home in the Prairie Avenue district, south of Chicago’s Loop. Completed in 1887, the 17,000 square feet of space looks like a fortress from the exterior, but feels cozily intimate inside. The owners of Victorian homes must have looked a bit askance at this forerunner of more modern Chicago architecture by Frank Lloyd Wright, Louis Sullivan and Mies Van der Rohe.

My outdoor live music event would be a great way to experience the Glessner House, but a visit any time of the year is a must for anyone interested in Chicago history or architecture. Locals and people from all over the world find their way to this architectural masterpiece. Join them!

www.glessnerouse.org

Manet and Modern Beauty at the Art Institute of Chicago

You might think that yet another art show on a French Impressionist would be a missable event, but the Art Institute’s exhibit, Manet and Modern Beauty should change your mind.

It has been over 50 years since the AIC has done a solo show on Edouard Manet and the curators have wisely honed in on his later years. Ill health and less mobility may have caused him to turn to smaller canvases and more intimate subjects like feminine beauty with pastels and water colors joining his use of oils.

I loved a small transitional room featuring live plants, a lovely view of the green foliage outside of the museum and a wall of photos depicting Manet’s social network. Unbeknownst to me, female artist Berthe Morisot was his sister-in-law.

His letters on display are filled with delightful images of flowers, fruits and beautifully dressed women. We also get to see unfinished works that allow the viewer to get glimpses of his creative process. The exhibit is punctuated with his larger oil canvases as well. A final room of his flower paintings is like the dessert course to this satisfying artistic meal.

All children under 14 and Chicagoans under age 18 are admitted free. Illinois residents gain free admittance Thursdays from 5 pm to 8 pm when the museum is open later.

https://www.artic.edu/exhibitions/2822/manet-and-modern-beauty